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Volume 3

Volume 3

Table of Contents

Article

Cultural Competence

Authors

Thyria Greene Ansley, Ph.D. Associate Professor Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL, Charles P. Ervin, Jr., Ph.D. Assistant Professor Florida A&M University Tallahassee, FL, Elizabeth K. Davenport, Ph.D. Associate Professor Florida A&M University ,Tallahassee, FL

Abstract

Students bring their own ‘cultural capital’ to the classroom, and often, it is ignored or lost in the dynamics of classroom instruction and management. An understanding of culture is fundamental for understanding children in modern classrooms. A student’s culture has a significant influence on how well he/she will achieve. The authors of this article advocate the teaching of cultural competency to improve the educational outcomes of minority, poor, and other disenfranchised students in American classrooms.

Article

The Impact of a Multicultural Training Program on Adolescents’ Understanding of Cultural Awareness

Authors

Richmond D. Wynn University of North Florida, Andrea I. Hart University of Florida, Sharon T. Wilburn University of North Florida, Dax M. Weaver Health-Tech Consultants, Inc., Kenneth T. Wilburn University of North Florida

Abstract

Metrotown Institute is a four-day, nine hour a day intensive, experiential diversity education program for youth in grades 10-12. Primary evaluation goals are to provide a description of program and non-program participants in the study, determine if the program had a significant impact on the participants, and determine if there was a significant difference in positive attitudes toward diversity between the Institute participants and non-participants. The Diversity Opinionnaire was used as an assessment measure of the Institute’s success. Forty-three teens participated in the Institute and completed the Diversity Opinionnaire pretest and posttests. Within an equivalent time period, this survey was completed by 65 non-participating youth. Of the Institute youth the majority was African-American, and 61% were female. Sixty three percent gave their religious affiliation as Christian. Following completion, the diversity training data indicated that overall group members were significantly more strongly disposed toward a multi-culture viewpoint. There was a statistically significant difference on all three dimensions of the Diversity Opinionnaire between the means of the participants and the non-participants. Based on these results, OneJax Metrotown Institute is making a critical difference in changing the attitudes of its participants towards a greater acceptance and receptivity to diversity.

Key words: adolescent multiculturalism, experiential diversity education programs

Article

First Year Nursing Students’ Perceptions of Death at Jen-Te Junior College in Taiwan

Authors

Kuan-Hao Chen M.Ed, Dr. Angela Spaulding College of Education and Social Sciences West Texas A&M University, Dr. Susan J. Nix College of Education and Social Sciences West Texas A&M University

Abstract

In recent years, there have been many disasters and casualties in Taiwan. Through suicide, accidental death, diseases, and death caused by violence, death seems to engulf life. Yet, death is a taboo subject in Chinese culture. When death occurs, it is always taken care of privately and often causes feelings of fear and helplessness, which leads to grief counseling and, due to the strong emotional nature of adolescent relationships, death impacts on a large scale. In particular, Schachter (1991, 1992) states that adolescent students do not know how to face the sudden death of their peers and as such, may experience a mental or emotional breakdown. Problems are connected to the students’ attitudes about death. In particular, Taiwanese adolescents understand that their society does not expect them to grieve for their peers.

Article

The Effects of Response Cards on Off –Tasks Behavior and Academic Performance of African American Boys with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Author

Karen B. Patterson, University of North Florida

Abstract

The use of appropriate interventions is a critical component of educating students, particularly African Americans in special education. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of response cards on the off-tasks and academic performance of 8 African American boys identified as having emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) and learning disabilities (LD) in special education. Findings indicate that the use of response cards could be an effective intervention strategy for decreasing off-task behaviors while improving academic performance and positive outcomes for students with EBD. This study supported earlier findings in which response cards were used during class instruction.

Article

African American Teachers

Authors

Jackie Collins Robinson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology - Florida A&M University, Tameka Bradley Hobbs, Ph.D., State Library of Richmond - Richmond, VA, Nneka Joseph, B.A., Jermaine Robertson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Department of Psychology – Florida A&M University, Gwendolyn Singleton, Ph. D., Assistant Professor Department of Psychology – Florida A&M University

Abstract

Forty-one African American teachers at two predominantly African American primary/secondary schools were given the African Self -Consciousness scale and were asked to assess the extent to which they believed students related to the experiences of their ancestors as well as to four major events in African American history. Results showed that among teachers’ African Self-Consciousness scores, only one of three African Self-Consciousness Scale factor means fell in the “high” range – factor 4 (Value for African Culture). In addition, teachers perceived African American students’ connection to their African American ancestry as limited. African Self-Consciousness Scale factor 4 was significantly positively correlated with teachers’ perceptions of their students’ ability to connect to their ancestors (r=.33; p<.05) and with teachers’ overall perception of students’ historical connectedness (r=.32; p<.05). Implications for the ethnic identity of African American teachers and how it may impact the learner are discussed.

Book Review

Culture, Religion and Education: A Multicultural Analysis of Amartya Sen's IDENTITY AND VIOLENCE

Author

Stephen O'Hanlon

Abstract

In his 2006 book, Identity and Violence, Amartya Sen argues that humans have plural identities and that, by improperly focusing on singular identity, society can create an illusion of destiny. Singular identity, whether based on a particular culture or religion can be exclusionary to those that are not associated with a particular identity. In turn, Sen argues that this singular identity can be harnessed to provoke violence against individuals who are not encompassed within a particular identity.

In this paper, I discuss two aspects of Sen’s thesis that I believe are problematic. First, I contend that Sen’s cultural pluralism may not fully account for the importance that particular people attach to culture. I do not rehearse multicultural critiques of liberalism. Instead, I argue that liberalism and proper respect for culture should, on the whole, be coincident. Second, I will assess Sen’s arguments against religious schooling in the United Kingdom and I argue that such schooling is not as problematic as Sen contends.


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