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Volume 2

Volume 2

Table of Contents

Article

Using Natural Diversity to Teach Diverse Learners

Author

Charles B. Hutchison, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Abstract

The notion of multiculturalism is viewed by some as a program for accommodating minority cultures. It is, however, a concept that should help all teachers to better understand and reach all their students. In this paper, an African transplant teacher in America shares some activities that illustrate how to use diversity to create a more effective classroom.

Article

Assessment of Anger: A Measure of Cultural Differences in Adolescent Anger Expressions

Author

DeAnna McKinnie Burney, Florida A&M University

Abstract

Ethnic and racial differences in anger among adolescents deserve closer attention, because research studies are limited. The current study seeks to provide researchers educators, and psychological practitioners alternative ways of assessing and interpreting differences in anger expression across cultures. Two hundred seventy four 11 to 19-year-old adolescents in grades 6 through 12 participated in this study. The Adolescent Anger Rating Scale (AARS) was used to measure specific types of anger: instrumental, reactive, and anger control. While several scales have been developed to measure the construct of anger, none has identified specific types of anger for empirical study and behavior intervention (Buss & Durkee, 1957; Fiendler & Ecton, 1986; Sharkin & Gelso, 1991). Discriminant validity and group mean comparisons were used to further support the construct validity of the AARS. Repeated measures ANOVAs were computed to assess differences in mean scores by student race, grade, and gender. The AARS demonstrated ability to identify group differences among gender, race, grade. Results observed interaction and main effects for demographic variables observed in this study. Discriminant validity evidence was obtained between the AARS and Multidimensional Anger Inventory. Overall, these results support the construct validity of scores from the AARS. Therefore, the AARS is considered worthy of further development and validation, as well as use among psychological practitioners and researchers. The AARS demonstrated ability to identify group differences among gender, race, and grade. Therefore, the AARS is considered useful for assessing culturally diverse adolescents with increased patterns of negative anger expressions.

Article

Beyond the Cream of the Crop: African Males in the Classroom

Author

Tony Manson

Article

Public Education's Role in Northern Ireland's Peace Process: An Analysis of Two Initiatives

Author(s)

Ashley Hall and Sara Fry, Bucknell University

Abstract

In a land divided by a sectarian conflict that has resulted in tumultuous political and economic conditions, public schools in Northern Ireland play a unique role in the peace process. Northern Ireland has three types of publicly funded schools: faith-based schools primarily attended by Catholic students, faith based schools attended by Protestant students, and integrated schools that bring students from both faiths together. This article presents the findings of a qualitative investigation into the impact of two public school initiatives to increase communication and understanding among the two faiths: Education for Mutual Understanding (which occurs in faith-based schools) and Integration. Interviews were conducted with educators representing different faiths and types of schools in order to provide a balanced view of the relative strengths and structural obstacles to these initiatives. The findings suggest both approaches to supporting Northern Ireland’s peace process have a limited ability to manifest change because they do not impact the family, community, and cultural influences that surround public school students.

Article

Beyond Parent Involvement: Facilitating Successful Partnerships with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families

Authors

Karen B. Patterson and Susan M. Syverud, University of North Florida

Abstract

The role teachers play in acknowledging, educating, and celebrating the cultural and linguistic diversity of children in their classrooms while at the same time striving for academic achievement is daunting, but critical. In maximizing successful opportunities for students, it is important to recognize that families are a critical link to achieving the desired outcomes for students. Yet, achieving parental involvement and collaborative partnership with parents is not without challenges for teachers. The purpose of this article is fourfold. First, this article explains how current educational law highlights the importance of parental involvement. Second, the increasing culturally and linguistically diverse school population is described, emphasizing the diversity with the special education population, in particular. Third, the advantages of collaborative partnerships are explicated. Lastly, recommendations to improve and increase positive collaboration between families and teachers are delineated.

Article

The Effects of Mulitculturalism within the Parameters of Instructional Course Design

Author

David R. Blunt, PhD (candidate), Walden University

Abstract

The communication of an effective curriculum finds its dependency within the multicultural environment of the classroom, and efficacy of the professional educator while embracing student diversity. Successful student assimilation may depend upon the accuracy of an established curriculum that appropriately adapts to a flexible teaching and learning environment, in which both instructor and student benefit. Furthermore, the students’ cultural orientation and home community socio-influences become problematic for a historically White, middle class, monocultural teacher who lacks adequate diversity training techniques. Preparation requires multicultural training, one in which teachers do not perceive students of color with views of low academic expectations. Therefore, multicultural educational course design must account for the stereotype, ethical, and racial myths that abound throughout the education system.

Article

Addressing Accountability via Contextual Teaching and Learning

Authors

Clemente Charles Hudson, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Dawn Holley Dennis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor

Abstract

This article discusses the role of Contextual Teaching and Learning in addressing the issues of Accountability in today’s schools. The concept of Contextual Teaching and Learning is explored as administrators and teachers at Florida A&M University Developmental Research School assess their teaching philosophies via the Zinn Philosophy of Adult Education Inventory. The Inventory is based on five philosophical tenets, as practiced by Adult Educators (Zinn 1983). This was the first step in a three phase process that (1) introduce the faculty to Contextual Teaching and Learning and teaching philosophy (2) provide a collaboration with University faculty in Florida, Georgia and Ohio in developing options for faculty professional development and (3) explore Discover CTL: An online system for teacher development in Contextual Teaching and Learning.

Book Review

Beyond Silenced Voices: Class, Race and Gender in United States schools - Revised Edition

Authors

Lora Helvie-Mason and Roger D. Wessel, Ball State University


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