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Medical Services Immunizations

Immunizations

Required Immunizations

Recommended Immunizations

What is Meningitis?

Where can I find the forms to submit?

Where can I get the vaccine?

What do I do with my vaccine documentation or affidavit?

 

 


Meningitis Vaccine

Texas law requires all students entering an institution of higher education (public and private) to either receive a vaccination against bacterial meningitis or meet certain criteria for declining such a vaccination. This law also requires that the meningitis vaccination occurs within a five-year period before the student arrives at school. This applies to all new incoming students, under the age of 30, regardless of living on or off campus or any student, under the age of 22, that sits out a long semester.

West Texas A&M University does not require students to show proof of any other immunization to attend the University. However, the staff of Student Medical Services strongly recommends that all students be current on certain immunizations. If you are 18 years of age or younger and do not have insurance or your insurance does not cover vaccinations, there is a Texas Vaccine for Children Program through West Texas A&M University that will allow the patient  to receive the vaccine at $10.00 per vaccine.

Meningitis Vaccine - forms  

Please go to the following web page to download any forms regarding the required meningitis vaccine:

www.wtamu.edu/meningitis

 

What is Meningitis?


Meningitis is a rare but potentially fatal bacterial infection that can affect either the brain or spinal cord or infect the blood. Permanent brain damage, hearing loss, kidney failure or death can result from this infection. Certain groups of people are most at risk for this infection. College freshmen who live in residence halls are one of the susceptible groups. The bacteria are spread through direct contact and through air droplets. Symptoms of the disease are often mistaken for the flu – high fever, rash, neck stiffness, headache, nausea and vomiting. There is a vaccine available which is 80% effective at preventing the 4 types of bacteria that cause 70% of the disease in the U.S. Immunity develops within 7-10 days of receiving the vaccine and is effective for 3-5 years.

Where can I get the meningitis vaccine?

 If you are a currently enrolled student for the current semester, are attending a WTAMU New Student Orientation,  or have registered for the  upcoming semester, you can purchase and receive the vaccine through West Texas A&M Student Medical Services located on campus in  VHAC 104.  Call (806) 651-3287 for availability of supply, vaccine administration times and qualification requirements for student enrollment.   If you are not a current student or have not registered as a student at West Texas A&M University,  you can check with your primary care provider or many of the local pharmacies in your area.  Please note that West Texas A&M University Student Medical Services  does not file insurance claims on behalf of the patient. 

Be sure to bring your Buffalo Gold Card with you to your appointment!  You will be carded when you enter the building. 


Are there any patient assistance programs to pay for the meningitis vaccine?

 There is a Texas Vaccine for Children Program that can assist patients  that need the Meningitis vaccine and/or the  HPV Gardasil vaccine at the discounted price of $10  each.  To be eligible for the Texas Vaccine for Children Program, the patient must be 18 years of age or younger and be uninsured.


What if I do not want to get the vaccination?

Evidence to Decline Vaccination must be submitted in one of the following formats:

  • An affidavit or a certificate signed by a physician who is duly registered and licensed to practice medicine in the United States, in which it is stated that, in the physician's opinion, the vaccination required would be injurious to the health and well-being of the student. Or submission of the completed Meningitis Medical Exemption Form
  • An affidavit signed by the student stating that the student declines the vaccination for bacterial meningitis for reasons of conscience, including a religious belief.
  • Students living on campus: A conscientious exemption form from the Texas Department of State Health Services must be used and can be requested here - Affidavit Request for Exemption from Immunizations for Reasons of Conscience. Please allow several weeks for delivery.
  • Students NOT living on campus: May complete the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Affidavit and submit the original notarized document to the Office of Admissions. NOTE: Students must be 18 years of age or older to submit this form. Students under the age of 18 must use the affidavit above.
  • Students who intend to enroll in Distance Education courses (or online only) must submit the petition for a waiver available here - Petition to Waive Bacterial Meningitis Vaccination Requirement for ALL Online.
  • Students over the age of 30 may submit a completed Meningitis Vaccination Waiver-Over 30 Form
Where can I obtain these forms?  www.wtamu.edu/meningitis

What do I do with my vaccination information or affidavit?

Please submit a copy of your vaccination record or use the Evidence of Vaccination Against Meningitis Form - to:


Office of Admissions
WTAMU Box 60907
Canyon, TX
79016-0001

Email: admissions@wtamu.edu
Fax: 806-651-5285
Do not fax the affidavit as it will appear as an illegal document.  This must be mailed, scanned and e-mailed  or delivered. 
Phone: 1-800-99-WTAMU or 806-651-2020

     

What information do I need to include? 

Please include your complete name,  WTAMU Buffalo Gold Card number (if you know it) date of birth and a contact telephone number on all documentation. Make sure it is legible and always keep a copy for yourself.



 

Recommended Immunizations

 (prices subject to change)

Hepatitis A

Recommended for all college students. Hepatitis A is transmitted through the fecal-oral route., series of two vaccines. (

Hepatitis B

Recommended for all students, required for several majors (nursing, communication disorders, athletic training). Series of 3 immunizations administered over a 6-month period. Hepatitis B is a disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. You can become infected directly through blood or body fluids, or indirectly through contact with surfaces or objects that are contaminated with the virus,  series of three vaccines.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) (Gardasil)

The HPV Vaccine  -- a series of 3 doses. This vaccine is available through the Texas Vaccine for Children Program for  $10.00 for students that can qualify for this program (see below).   There is also a patient assistance program for students with no insurance or if their insurance does not cover the vaccine. If approved, the student can receive the vaccine at no charge. Gardasil is a preventive vaccine against HPV subtypes 6, 11, 16, and 18 which are linked to cervical cancer and genital warts. 

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)

Most commonly children receive MMR (Measles, Mumps Rubella) as one immunization. If MMR was received must have had 2 doses, at least 30 days apart, after age 1. (Not available at SMS).

Meningitis (Bacterial) - REQUIRED

       Meningitis is a rare but potentially fatal bacterial infection that can affect either the brain or spinal cord or infect the blood.  Permanent brain damage, hearing loss, kidney failure or death can result from this infection.  Certain groups of people are most at risk for this infection. College freshmen who live in residence halls are one of the susceptible groups.  The bacteria are spread through direct contact and through air droplets. Symptoms of the disease are often mistaken for the flu – high fever, rash, neck stiffness, headache, nausea and vomiting.  There is a vaccine available which is 80% effective at preventing the 4 types of bacteria that cause 70% of the disease in the U.S. Immunity develops within 7-10 days of receiving the vaccine and is effective for 3-5 years. 

Polio (IPV)

3-4 doses in early childhood. (Not available at SMS)

Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis (Tdap)

One dose within the last 10 years. Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis are serious, sometimes fatal, diseases

Varicella (Chickenpox) 

2 doses, one month apart only for students with no history of chickenpox. (Not available at SMS)

 



Updated April 7, 2014